Popular 70’s Board Games

The 70s was an interesting period for children, as they were able to enjoy different forms of entertainment that were considered new during that time. These forms of entertainment include video games such as the ones released for the Atari 2600 consoles and innovative movies never seen before in cinemas like Star Wars. However, not a lot of kids were able to own video game consoles or go to the movies frequently; instead, they would rather spend their free time playing board games with friends and family members.

Board games have been a favorite pastime of kids and even adults way before the 70s, and several games still continue to be popular until today because it is one of the cheapest ways to enjoy quality time with loved ones. There have been many popular board games in the 70s, but only a few truly stood the test of time because of their unique gameplay mechanics and how fun they are to play. Here are some well-known 70s board games that you can still get today in toy stores and online shops.

Product
Visual
Where to Buy
Sorry!
Battleship
Mastermind
Hands Down
Pay Day

Sorry!

Sorry! is a board game with a simple title that means a lot once you play it. Players must choose a color and place their play pieces on the color of their choice, and then they would need to move around the board in a clockwise manner and reach the finish line for their chosen color. In order to move, each player must draw a card and follow the instructions indicated on its front side. The gameplay seems simple, but the catch is that you can force players to move backward or even to go back to the starting line. Once you force an opposing player to move right back to the start, all you can really say is, “Sorry!”

Battleship

Battleship is a complex guessing game where you have to figure out where the opponent’s ships are located by firing missiles in one tile per turn. Each player will be given different vessels like aircraft carriers, submarines, destroyer ships, patrol boats, and of course, battleships. These ships vary in size; the smaller boats are harder to hit since they don’t occupy a lot of space on the board while the larger ships won’t go down pretty easy since you have to hit all of their occupied spaces to sink them. The player who is able to destroy all of the opponent’s ships wins the game.

Mastermind

Another guessing game, Mastermind allows one player to make a secret code while the other players will have to guess it correctly. However, there are only ten tries for all codebreaker players to guess the secret code, and if they weren’t able to crack it, the codemaker wins the game. In order to make it easier for codebreakers to find out the secret code, the codemaker will have to show whether one peg on the board is correct by placing a small red peg and if multiple pegs are in the code but are not in the right place by inserting small white pegs on the board.

Hands Down

Hands Down is a straightforward game where players must slap the hand paddle on the board if they own two cards that have the same images at the front. All players must slap the hand paddle if a pair of cards is shown, and the last one to perform this action will have to give a card to the player who owns the pair. A player that doesn’t have a pair may fake it and act like he or she will be slapping the hand paddle, and if an opposing player slaps the paddle first, then he or she will have to give a card to the one who faked the slap. The player who accumulates the most point by getting plenty of cards will win the game.

Pay Day

Pay Day is a classic board game created in the 70s, which involves players saving as much money as they can as their avatars move around the calendar-like board. However, most players probably wouldn’t be able to save all of their money since there are multiple tiles on the board that requires them to pay something. Once they reach the end of the month on the board, they will be able to get money and restart to the beginning of the month. The player who saved a lot of money within two months will win, but the duration of the game can also depend on how many months the players will set.

Product
Visual
Where to Buy
Connect 4
Masterpiece
Don’t Spill the Beans
Hungry Hungry Hippos
Boggle

Connect 4

An improved version of Tic-Tac-Toe, Connect 4 pits two players against each other to see who will be the fastest to connect four discs of the same color. Playing Connect 4 will take a little bit longer than a round of Tic-Tac-Toe since there are more tiles involved in the board. A player can block the opponent from connecting four discs, but he or she must also connect four as well. The game can sometimes be chaotic as you try to block and connect at the same time.

Masterpiece

Masterpiece is a complicated game of selling and buying paintings at an imaginary auction, and whoever earns the most money and collects the most paintings wins the game. Players must move around the board to find out whether they can receive money, get paintings from the bank, or sell paintings on an auction. Unfortunately, no newer versions of Masterpiece were produced since the 2010s, so finding one for a lower price can be difficult.

Don’t Spill the Beans

Don’t Spill the Beans is another simple game that requires players to throw beans on the pot without tipping it over and causing it to spill all the beans. In the original version of Don’t Spill the Beans that was released in the 60s, the beans that were used were real kidney beans, but it was replaced by plastic ones in the 80s as the board game is starting to be mass-produced.

Hungry Hungry Hippos

Hungry Hungry Hippos is a unique game where players must collect as many balls as possible on the pit by controlling their hippos on the board and letting them munch on the small balls. For the hippos to open their mouths, each player must press the hippo’s tail and let go of it for the hippo’s mouth to close. The player who collected the most balls will win the round.

Boggle

Boggle is a word game that is similar to Scrabble, but instead of creating your own words, you must find them in a tray full of jumbled up letters and compete with others to see who will be able to find the most words on the board. To start the game, a player must put all the letter cubes inside the tray and close it using the included dome. Once the tray is closed, the player must then shake it multiple times and place it back on the table while making sure that all cubes are inserted on each tile of the tray properly. The players will then be given three minutes to find as many words as they can, and the one who searches for the most words will win the game.

All of the board games mentioned above are surely fun to play, although some of them are starting to become more and more difficult to find since the interest in board games nowadays is slowly dwindling. If you have fantastic memories of playing these games and want the younger generation of your family to enjoy these popular 70s board games, then get them while you still can.